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brown, who joins us live right now. mr. brown, congratulations. how have you done it? >> thank you, mainly through 35,000 men and women in uniform, but particularly through something called operation at attack where we send as many uniformed police officers as possible into areas where we have seen spikes and violence, particularly shootings. >> that sounds almost like a back to basics campaign. why was the decision taken to go in that direction? >> well, it started with mayor bloomberg and commissioner kelly coming into the office right after 9/11 with a deep downturn in the economy, less tax revenue. we lost 6000 police officers through attrition, we have 6000 fewer now than we had then. that forced us to take a look at how we deploy officers into the city. instead of dividing them up as we usually did into 76 precincts, we focused better on defining exactly where the most violent crimes were happening and putting the biggest number of officers there, the biggest bang for the block. new recruits coming out of the police academy, they all went there. they all went there, teams of
>> brown: congress stepped back from the brink of financial turmoil, at least for now, after the house passed a tax plan late last night and sent it to president obama. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we look at how the vote came about and sort through some of the political consequences as a result of what's in the bill and what's not. >> brown: then, new killings in pakistan, we look at the uptick in violence against aid workers and women teachers with "washington post" foreign affairs reporter pam constable. >> woodruff: paul solman takes us inside a company that turns a profit by employing an unusual workforce. >> a massachusetts manufacturing firm founded in 1932 where the median age is 74 and rosa finnegan over there, is 100.
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